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When to Talk Money With Your Ideal Client and more….

Posted by Ilise Benun on

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In last week’s webinar, 3 Steps to Your Ideal Clients (recordings here if you missed it), there were more burning questions for my surprise guest, the ideal client, (a.k.a. Jamie Saunders, Senior Marketing Communications Manager at Neenah Paper and Packaging,) than we had time to answer.

So Jamie took more time to answer them here:

Q: At what point do we mention budget/money or a contract, if they like our work?

A: Not until you’ve been approached with an actual project. I wouldn’t talk budget/money unless I was asking for work. 

Q: Do you recommend approaching your favorite client, for recommendations on people like themselves, who may be looking for someone?

A: Sure, we’ve done plenty of recommendations. LinkedIn is a great place for that.

Q: When you are asking a firm or a designer to work on a project, would you honestly give them a budget or you will let them give you a quote?

A: We usually give a budget up front. It’s much easier to get a realistic quote if you are up front with what you are willing to spend. Very rarely does someone come back and say, “Ok my quote is exactly what your budget is! What a coincidence.” Usually when we are unsure about pieces of the project (when they are not essential to the project) or don’t know what something will cost, we will ask the designer to quote that piece of the work separately. That way, we can decide whether we can afford it or not when the quote comes back.

Q: When a project has been completed – how do you feel about and/or prefer to handle an honest debrief on your (as a client) satisfaction (or not) on the project?

A: We love to do de-briefings. We call them “roundtable reviews.” It’s a great way for everyone to give honest feedback about how the project turned out. You should be getting feedback along the way, however, as to the client’s feelings on the project. No roundtable review feedback should be a complete surprise.

Q: Can you suggest some methods to “break-up” with a problematic client – not for one project…but for good!

A: Read this recent blog post by copywriter, Deidre Rienzo of ConnectWithCopy.com about how she graciously broke up with a “problem client” recently and in which she generously shares the exact message she used to let them down lightly.

This is just a taste of what you’ll learn at The Get Better Clients Bootcamp, my new 18916-HDL17_Social-Media-Images_300x2501/2 day intensive coming up this May 2, 2017 in Chicago. Come for a half day, then stay for HOW Design Live (or not!) Get a copy of my Marketing Blueprint if you sign up before Tuesday, March 21, 2017 — it’s time to decide.

I hope to see you there!

 

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